Lazulite

Big Photo

Pakistan
0.75 carats
© irocks.com

Lazulite was first described in 1795 for deposits in Styria, Austria. Its name comes from the German lazurstein - blue stone; or from the Arabic - heaven, because of its blue colour.

Lazulite is sometimes confused with 2 better known and more common minerals: lazurite and azurite. Lazulite frequently appears as euhedral crystals rather than in massive form.

Lazulite Gemstones by Colour

This table shows the variety of hues this gemstone can be found in. Click on a photo for more information.
 
 
 

Lazulite Gemstones by Size

This table shows distribution of Lazulite gemstone sizes that are listed on this site. This can give a good indication as to the general availability of this gemstone in different sizes.
Contributed photos
Lightest:0.07 cts
Heaviest:11.36 cts
Average:1.52 cts
Total photos:13
Do you have a larger Lazulite? Why not upload a photo?
0.07ct to 1.20ct1.20ct to 2.33ct2.33ct to 3.46ct3.46ct to 4.59ct4.59ct to 5.72ct5.72ct to 6.84ct6.84ct to 7.97ct7.97ct to 9.10ct9.10ct to 10.23ct10.23ct to 11.36ct
General Information
Chemical Formula
(Mg,Fe)Al
 
2
(PO
 
4
)
 
2
(OH)
 
2
Arthur Thomas, Gemstones (2009)
More from other references
Photos of natural/un-cut material from mindat.org
Physical Properties of Lazulite
Mohs Hardness5.5
Herve Nicolas Lazzarelli, Blue Chart Gem Identification (2010)
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Specific Gravity3.04 to 3.17
Herve Nicolas Lazzarelli, Blue Chart Gem Identification (2010)
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TenacityBrittle
Walter Schumann, Gemstones of the world (2001)
Cleavage QualityIndistinct
Walter Schumann, Gemstones of the world (2001)
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FractureUneven,Splintery
Walter Schumann, Gemstones of the world (2001)
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Optical Properties of Lazulite
Refractive Index1.604 to 1.646
Herve Nicolas Lazzarelli, Blue Chart Gem Identification (2010)
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Optical CharacterBiaxial/-
Herve Nicolas Lazzarelli, Blue Chart Gem Identification (2010)
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Birefringence0.031 to 0.036
Herve Nicolas Lazzarelli, Blue Chart Gem Identification (2010) DoublingMore from other references
PleochroismTransparent crystals show a strong pleochroism: colorless - light blue - dark (violet) blue
Herve Nicolas Lazzarelli, Blue Chart Gem Identification (2010)
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Dispersion0.014
Arthur Thomas, Gemstones (2009)
Colour
Colour (General)Dark blue to blue-white, green-blue
Walter Schumann, Gemstones of the world (2001)
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Causes of ColourBlue, Fe2+-O-Fe3+ charge transfer
W. William Hanneman, Pragmatic Spectroscopy For Gemologists (2011)
TransparencyTransparent,Translucent,Opaque
Herve Nicolas Lazzarelli, Blue Chart Gem Identification (2010) Commonly opaqueMore from other references
LustreVitreous
Arthur Thomas, Gemstones (2009)
Fluorescence & other light emissions
Fluorescence (General)None
Walter Schumann, Gemstones of the world (2001)
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Crystallography of Lazulite
Crystal SystemMonoclinic
Herve Nicolas Lazzarelli, Blue Chart Gem Identification (2010)
More from other references
HabitStubby to acute dipyramidal crystals
Michael O’Donoghue, Gems, Sixth Edition (2006)
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Geological Environment
Where found:Occurs in granite pegmatites and in quartzites
Michael O’Donoghue, Gems, Sixth Edition (2006)
Further Information
Mineral information:Lazulite information at mindat.org
Significant Gem Localities
Brazil
 
  • Minas Gerais
Gems, Sixth Edition, Michael O’Donoghue, 2006, p. 323
Canada
 
  • Yukon Territory
    • Dawson Mining District
mindat.org
Copyright © Jolyon & Katya Ralph 1993-2014. Site Map. Locality, gem & photograph data are the copyright of the individuals who submitted them. For more information please contact the . Gemdat.org is an online information resource dedicated to providing free gemmological information to all.