Sussexite

Sussexite is named after its discovery locality, at Franklin, Sussex County, New Jersey, USA.

Sussexite forms white, pink, yellowish white prismatic and typically fibrous crystals with a pearly lustre. The material is usually translucent.

Sussexite is an extremely rare gem.
General Information
Chemical Formula
Mn
2+
 
BO
 
2
(OH)
Anthony et al, Handbook of mineralogy (2001)
Photos of natural/un-cut material from mindat.org
Physical Properties of Sussexite
Mohs Hardness3 to 3.5
Anthony et al, Handbook of mineralogy (2001)
Specific Gravity3.30
Anthony et al, Handbook of mineralogy (2001)
Optical Properties of Sussexite
Optical CharacterBiaxial/-
Anthony et al, Handbook of mineralogy (2001)
Dispersion1.670 to 1.732
Anthony et al, Handbook of mineralogy (2001)
Colour
Colour (General)White to buff, straw-yellow, pale pink; colorless in transmitted light.
Anthony et al, Handbook of mineralogy (2001)
TransparencyTransparent,Translucent
Anthony et al, Handbook of mineralogy (2001)
LustreSilky,Dull (Earthy)
Anthony et al, Handbook of mineralogy (2001)
Crystallography of Sussexite
Crystal SystemMonoclinic
Anthony et al, Handbook of mineralogy (2001)
HabitAs bladed acicular crystals, to 7 mm; cross-vein or radial fibrous, in felted or matted aggregates, nodular.
Anthony et al, Handbook of mineralogy (2001)
Geological Environment
Where found:A rare hydrothermal mineral typically in veinlets in boron-bearing metamorphosed Mn–Fe–Zn deposits.
Anthony et al, Handbook of mineralogy (2001)
Further Information
Mineral information:Sussexite information at mindat.org
Significant Gem Localities
USA
 
  • New Jersey
    • Sussex Co.
      • Franklin mining district
        • Ogdensburg
          • Sterling Hill
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