Serendibite

Serendibite is named after "Serendib", the old Arabic name for Sri Lanka, where the mineral was found.

Serendibite forms small blue-green, blue-grey to deep blue, sometimes yellow, transparent tabular crystals. The material is strongly pleochroic: yellowish green, bluish green and violet-blue.

Cut stones are rare and usually of small size.
General Information
Chemical Formula
Ca
 
2
(Mg,Al)
 
6
(Si,Al,B)
 
6
O
 
20
Michael O’Donoghue, Gems, Sixth Edition (2006)
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Photos of natural/un-cut material from mindat.org
Physical Properties of Serendibite
Mohs Hardness6.5 to 7
Ulrich Henn and Claudio C. Milisenda, Gemmological Tables (2004)
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Specific Gravity3.43 to 3.44
Ulrich Henn and Claudio C. Milisenda, Gemmological Tables (2004)
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Cleavage QualityNone
Arthur Thomas, Gemstones (2009)
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FractureUneven
Arthur Thomas, Gemstones (2009)
Optical Properties of Serendibite
Refractive Index1.696 to 1.702
Ulrich Henn and Claudio C. Milisenda, Gemmological Tables (2004)
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Optical CharacterBiaxial/-
Ulrich Henn and Claudio C. Milisenda, Gemmological Tables (2004)
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Birefringence0.005
Ulrich Henn and Claudio C. Milisenda, Gemmological Tables (2004)
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PleochroismStrong: yellowish-green -- bluish-green --violet-blue
Ulrich Henn and Claudio C. Milisenda, Gemmological Tables (2004)
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DispersionStrong
Arthur Thomas, Gemstones (2009)
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Colour
Colour (General)Bluish-green, green-blue
Ulrich Henn and Claudio C. Milisenda, Gemmological Tables (2004)
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TransparencyTransparent
Ulrich Henn and Claudio C. Milisenda, Gemmological Tables (2004)
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LustreVitreous
Arthur Thomas, Gemstones (2009)
Crystallography of Serendibite
Crystal SystemTriclinic
Ulrich Henn and Claudio C. Milisenda, Gemmological Tables (2004)
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HabitTabular
Michael O’Donoghue, Gems, Sixth Edition (2006)
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Geological Environment
Where found:Occurs generally in skarns affected by boron metasomatism.
Michael O’Donoghue, Gems, Sixth Edition (2006)
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Further Information
Mineral information:Serendibite information at mindat.org
Significant Gem Localities
Myanmar
 
  • Mandalay Region
    • Pyin-Oo-Lwin District
        • Mogok Valley
Ted Themelis (2008) Gems & mines of Mogok
Ted Themelis (2008) Gems & mines of Mogok
  • Sagaing Region
    • Katha District
      • Wuntho Township
Ted Themelis (2008) Gems & mines of Mogok
Sri Lanka
 
  • Central Province
    • Ambakotte
Gems, Sixth Edition, Michael O’Donoghue, 2006, p. 449
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